The Retainer Wall

We did SO much this week! It was a very hardworking and fulfilling week. We started off the week by going to the House Bethesda Orphanage. When we arrived, we finished making a retainer wall that protected the land from a mudslide and made a pen for the pigs. We were covered in cement by the end!

Since it’s 2 hours away from Fang, we had a sleepover with the kids. It was amazing to see every single child with a big, bright smile greeting us. These kids are full of love and kindness. Grabbing our hands and arms to dance with us and attacking us with hugs. It was the first time for many of us at the orphanage , but they accepted us. We learned from the kids to accept one another and show kindness. This way you can brighten someone’s day a little. It was one of the happiest environments I have ever been in while in Thailand so far.

The CUTEST moments of this week are when all the kids at Mae Nawang brushed their teeth with the correct techniques that our team member Charlotte taught. We teach public health lessons twice a week at this village.

(The kids following Charlotte’s lead in how to brush teeth properly) I’ve never seen kids being so excited and happy to brush their teeth!

We also spent this week making more water pipeline systems, water dams, and water tanks to filter and direct water in another village! We love doing water projects in our communities we work in.

This place is a Lahu village with 7 homes. A small population but every villager has a big heart. We definitely felt welcomed, loved, and felt their gratitude. Although most of us could not communicate in Lahu or Thai, body language helped! We followed their lead during the project. It was one of the best experiences to learn how these villagers make a water system. Help + local community = we made a great team.

 

At the end of the day, the villagers gave us a small gift of homemade honey. We thanked them by giving handshakes and hugs. When one woman was hugged, her eyes filled with tears. As soon as we made eye contact with her, our tears dropped on our faces. She was saying things in the Lahu language that we did not understand, but we truly felt the sincerity. They were so grateful for us. We were more grateful of them to accept us and to trust us in working with them.

 

- The Thailand volunteers

 

 
 
 
 
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